Save Water, Add Color

Save Water, Add Color

Well, it's mid-July in Texas and it's HOT. Gardening in this weather is really only safe in the morning so be sure to keep hydrated and don't over do it. 

You might not be feeling very heat-hardy right now, but there are plenty of plants out there that thrive in the furnace that is a North Texas summer. What makes these plants drought-tolerant? Special adaptions help them to survive hot, dry spells. For instance, some plants have deep root systems, others have little hairs on their leaves to help them collect water from the air. Succulents store the water they need. Drought-tolerant plants can help conserve water because the don't need or use much of it. And don't think you have to sacrifice color! Drought tolerant plants come in all colors and sizes. 

Are you ready to get started? Here are some of our favorite colorful drought-tolerant plants!

Lantana is a super hardy perennial, and it comes in different bloom color variations. Lantana is a butterfly magnet, attracting butterflies of all kinds! The hardiness and its "butterfly-attracting-powers" make it a favorite of seasoned butterfly gardeners!

Texas lantana (Lantana urticoides)

Texas lantana (Lantana urticoides)

A taller perennial to pair with lantana is Mexican bush sage; this purple blooming salvia gets 3 feet tall and wide. This strikingly beautiful, low maintenance plant is perfect for Texas summers! Pollinators flock to this purple-flowered plant. Plus, who doesn't love fuzzy flowers?

Mexican Bush Sage (Salvia leucantha)

Mexican Bush Sage (Salvia leucantha)

Looking for a giant to round things out? The even taller Texas Star Hibiscus graces us with bright red blooms larger than your hand! No joke! Beauty aside, it’s diversity also makes it an attractive plant. Texas Star Hibiscus is happy in a water garden or in a drought tolerant patch.

If you need inspiration for your own drought-tolerant garden or you just want to see if it's truly possible to have a colorful garden in the middle of summer, stop by and visit Texas Discovery Gardens!